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Animals age at a faster rate than humans do, and your pet's health needs will evolve over time. Use this chart to figure out your pet's age in human years, and check with your veterinarian to establish a wellness plan specific to your young, adult or senior pet.

Pet Ages & Stages Chart

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The veterinary resources featured on this page provide useful information to pet owners on a variety of topics related to veterinary medicine and pet health care.

Animal Breed Associations

Animal Foundations & Research

Humane Societies

Kennels

Local Animal Laws & Government Agencies

Pet Grief Support

Pet Health Tips & Advice

Pet Insurance / Payment Options

Pet Photography

Pet Poison Control

Pet Products & Services

Veterinary Education

Following graduation from veterinary school, Dr. Kirmayer, our Chief of Staff, completed an internship in medicine and surgery followed by a residency in internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, school of Veterinary Medicine. His residency responsibilities included clinical care as well as teaching third and fourth year veterinary students.

Dr. Kirmayer also has extensive postgraduate training in ultrasound and echocardiographic imaging, endoscopy, and medical oncology. Dr. Kirmayer has completed the qualifying process of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. He is credentialed in autogous stem cell therapy.

In addition to providing general medicine and preventive care to his patients, Dr. Kirmayer sees veterinary referrals in the areas of internal medicine, oncology and imaging.

Dr. Whalen joined our staff in August of 2007. She completed her undergraduate degree in Nova Scotia and attended one of only four veterinary schools in Canada. Following graduation from the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island, Dr. Whalen relocated to Pennsylvania to commence general practice in veterinary medicine and has been practicing in the area since 2000. She has experience in internal medicine, oncology, soft tissue surgery, dentistry, ultrasonography and endoscopy.

Dr. Whalen is currently accepting patients in these disciplines, providing general preventive care, as well as consulting on more complex medical and surgical cases. She completed extensive training in veterinary acupuncture and is now accepting new patients for acupuncture therapy.

Dr. Harpster received his BS degree in Biology from Bucknell University in 1973, a MS degree in Physiology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1975, and VMD degree in Veterinary Medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in 1981. Prior to veterinary school, Dr. Harpster was a Marine Biologist with the Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research Laboratory, in St. Petersburg, Florida from 1975 to 1977. During his veterinary career, Dr. Harpster was also a co-owner of a veterinary/emergency hospital from 1985-2002, and served on the Pennsylvania State Board of Veterinary Medicine for eight years, five of these years serving as Chairman. Special interests in veterinary medicine include ophthalmology, soft tissue and orthopedic surgery, and endocrinology.

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2875 Valley Road
Marysville, PA 17053
P: (717) 957-3991
F: (717) 957-3941

What is Lyme disease?

Lyme disease is a tick-borne bacterial disease that can cause arthritis, kidney damage, and death in both dogs and people. Lyme disease is currently located in every US state.

Exposure to Lyme disease may be greater in dogs than in humans, because dogs spend more time outdoors. Ticks are prevalent year-round, making prevention efforts even more important.

dog tickWhat are the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease?

  • Lameness
  • Anorexia
  • Fever
  • Stiffness
  • Joint pain/swelling
  • Depression

Your pet may have Lyme disease and show no symptoms at all.

Animal Hospital of Rye is on Facebook! Be sure to view our page regularly for hospital information, helpful pet tips, and updates. We also encourage you to Like Us on Facebook and become a fan!

February is National Pet Dental Health Month, and to celebrate, we are offering 10% off Pet Dental Packages from February 1-28, 2017!

Now you may be wondering, How do I know my pet is suffering from dental pain? Unfortunately, our furry companions can’t talk to tell us when they are in pain or have a tooth ache. So we have to be diligent and rely on clues or changes in behavior that can help us identify a problem with their mouth. Here are a few things that may point to dental pain:

    dog-dental-health
  • No signs at all - Yes, you read that correctly! Dogs and cats rarely show signs of dental pain. This is an instinctual behavior, so that they do not look like weakened prey to other predators.
  • Bad Breath - Odor is a result of bacterial process. In pets with periodontal disease, there is an increase in bacteria so odors increase.
  • Change in Behavior - Chewing on one side of the mouth or decreased chewing, hiding, lack of grooming, and lethargy can all be signs of dental pain. Look for these abnormal behaviors as a clue that your pet has a mouth problem.
  • Bleeding - Bleeding from the mouth is usually due to periodontal disease. But there could also be lacerations in the mouth, abscesses or ulcers. Thick ropey saliva, or blood on toys/bedding could be an indication of any of the above problems.

pet-vaccine-needleThe main reason to vaccinate is for prevention. The cost to treat pets who are diagnosed with diseases such as Rabies, Parvo, Feline Leukemia, etc., versus the cost to vaccinate is huge! The risk associated with your pet contracting one of these sometimes fatal diseases is another important reason to vaccinate your pet.

Keeping your pet indoors does not prevent these diseases from spreading. Fleas and ticks can easily be brought indoors on your clothing, spreading the disease to your canine or feline friends. Small rodents such as field mice can also bring diseases into your home.

What vaccines does my pet need?

The answer varies based on your pet’s health and if they go outdoors (including cats), or frequent kennels or dog parks. The only vaccination currently required by Pennsylvania law is the Rabies vaccination. Cats and Dogs over the age of three months are required to be vaccinated, whether they leave your house or not.