Fall can be an exciting and fun time for you, but a scary time for your pet. We have some tips to keep your pets safe during all of the frightfully fun fall and Halloween activities.

Dog Halloween Cookies1. Especially on Halloween keep your pets safe from pranks.
Do not leave your pets unattended outdoors on the day before, the day of, or the day after Halloween. Cruel pranksters can hurt your pets. Black cats are especially high priority targets during Halloween.

2. No candy or fall treats for Fluffy the cat or Fido the dog.
While plain apples and plain pumpkin may be okay for your dogs, giving them candied apples or pumpkin pie is not. Due to the added sugars these can be harmful to your pets. You also want to keep any chocolates or goodies from trick or treating out of your pets reach. These treats may be delicious to us, but they are harmful to your pets and should not be given or in your pets reach. If they can smell them, they can find them!

Scheduling a procedure in which your pet needs to be anesthetized can be scary. While every procedure carries some risks- it is best to talk to your veterinarian before you panic.

Here are some of the most common myths about anesthesia:

Beagle Puppy Surgery RecoveryMyth #1: Anesthesia complications are common.

Complications do occur, but death is very rare. Studies show that for healthy cats and dogs the risk of death is approximately 1 in 2000. For animals with pre-existing disease it is approximately 1 in 500. Well trained veterinary teams will take every necessary precaution to minimize risks during anesthesia. We take into account every aspect of your pet’s health when coming up with the proper anesthetic protocol.

February is National Pet Dental Health Month, and to celebrate, we are offering 10% off Pet Dental Packages from February 1-28, 2017!

Now you may be wondering, How do I know my pet is suffering from dental pain? Unfortunately, our furry companions can’t talk to tell us when they are in pain or have a tooth ache. So we have to be diligent and rely on clues or changes in behavior that can help us identify a problem with their mouth. Here are a few things that may point to dental pain:

    dog-dental-health
  • No signs at all - Yes, you read that correctly! Dogs and cats rarely show signs of dental pain. This is an instinctual behavior, so that they do not look like weakened prey to other predators.
  • Bad Breath - Odor is a result of bacterial process. In pets with periodontal disease, there is an increase in bacteria so odors increase.
  • Change in Behavior - Chewing on one side of the mouth or decreased chewing, hiding, lack of grooming, and lethargy can all be signs of dental pain. Look for these abnormal behaviors as a clue that your pet has a mouth problem.
  • Bleeding - Bleeding from the mouth is usually due to periodontal disease. But there could also be lacerations in the mouth, abscesses or ulcers. Thick ropey saliva, or blood on toys/bedding could be an indication of any of the above problems.

pet-vaccine-needleThe main reason to vaccinate is for prevention. The cost to treat pets who are diagnosed with diseases such as Rabies, Parvo, Feline Leukemia, etc., versus the cost to vaccinate is huge! The risk associated with your pet contracting one of these sometimes fatal diseases is another important reason to vaccinate your pet.

Keeping your pet indoors does not prevent these diseases from spreading. Fleas and ticks can easily be brought indoors on your clothing, spreading the disease to your canine or feline friends. Small rodents such as field mice can also bring diseases into your home.

What vaccines does my pet need?

The answer varies based on your pet’s health and if they go outdoors (including cats), or frequent kennels or dog parks. The only vaccination currently required by Pennsylvania law is the Rabies vaccination. Cats and Dogs over the age of three months are required to be vaccinated, whether they leave your house or not.